Treatments

NERVOUS DISEASES

A neurological disorder is any disorder of the nervous system. Structural, biochemical or electrical abnormalities in the brain, spinal cord or other nerves can result in a range of symptoms. Examples of symptoms include paralysis, muscle weakness, poor coordination, loss of sensation, seizures, confusion, pain and altered levels of consciousness. There are many recognized neurological disorders, some relatively common, but many rare. They may be assessed by neurological examination, and studied and treated within the specialities of neurology and clinical neuropsychology.

Interventions for neurological disorders include preventive measures, lifestyle changes, physiotherapy or other therapy, neurorehabilitation, pain management, medication, operations performed by neurosurgeons or a specific diet.[1][2] The World Health Organization estimated in 2006 that neurological disorders and their sequelae (direct consequences) affect as many as one billion people worldwide, and identified health inequalities and social stigma/discrimination as major factors contributing to the associated disability and suffering.

HEMI & PARAPLEGIA

Hemiplegia, paralysis of the muscles of the lower face, arm, and leg on one side of the body. The most common cause of hemiplegia is stroke, which damages the corticospinal tracts in one hemisphere of the brain. The corticospinal tracts extend from the lower spinal cord to the cerebral cortex. They decussate, or cross, in the brainstem; therefore, damage to the right cerebral hemisphere results in paralysis of the left side of the body. Damage to the left hemisphere of a right-handed person may also result in aphasia. Other causes of hemiplegia include trauma, such as spinal cord injury; brain tumours; and brain infections.

SPINAL DISEASES

Causes of spinal stenosis may include: Overgrowth of bone. Wear and tear damage from osteoarthritis on your spinal bones can prompt the formation of bone spurs, which can grow into the spinal canal. Paget’s disease, a bone disease that usually affects adults, also can cause bone overgrowth in the spine.

RHEUMATIOD ARTHRITIS

Rheumatoid arthritis occurs when your immune system attacks the synovium — the lining of the membranes that surround your joints.

The resulting inflammation thickens the synovium, which can eventually destroy the cartilage and bone within the joint.

The tendons and ligaments that hold the joint together weaken and stretch. Gradually, the joint loses its shape and alignment.

Doctors don’t know what starts this process, although a genetic component appears likely. While your genes don’t actually cause rheumatoid arthritis, they can make you more susceptible to environmental factors — such as infection with certain viruses and bacteria — that may trigger the disease.

RENAL DISEASES

Chronic kidney disease, also called chronic kidney failure, describes the gradual loss of kidney function. Your kidneys filter wastes and excess fluids from your blood, which are then excreted in your urine. When chronic kidney disease reaches an advanced stage, dangerous levels of fluid, electrolytes and wastes can build up in your body.

In the early stages of chronic kidney disease, you may have few signs or symptoms. Chronic kidney disease may not become apparent until your kidney function is significantly impaired.

PILES DISEASES

Piles is another term for hemorrhoids. Hemorrhoids are collections of inflamed tissue in the anal canal. They contain blood vessels, support tissue, muscle, and elastic fibers.

Many people have piles, but the symptoms are not always obvious. Hemorrhoids cause noticeable symptoms for at least 50 percent of people in the United States (U.S.) before the age of 50 years.

This article will explore piles, their causes, how to diagnose, grade, and treat them, and what effects they might have on the body.

RHEUMATISM

Rheumatic diseases are characterized by inflammation that affects the connecting or supporting structures of the body — most commonly the joints, but also sometimes the tendons, ligaments, bones, and muscles. Some rheumatic diseases even affect the organs.

These diseases can ultimately cause loss of function in those body parts.

Rheumatic diseases include arthritis, which literally means “joint inflammation” and itself encompasses more than 100 different disorders. Rheumatic diseases that primarily affect the spine are considered spondyloarthropathies.

UTERUS DISORDER

Uterine Fibroids – The precise cause of uterine fibroids in unknown. However, some factors such hormones, family history and pregnancy increase the risk of uterine fibroids.

Endometriosis – It is generally caused by infections such as STI (sexually transmitted infections), tuberculosis and infections from normal vaginal bacteria.

Uterine prolapse – Ageing, lower levels of oestrogen, damaged pelvic muscles or tissues, obesity, chronic constipation, chronic cough can increase the risk of uterine prolapse.